A new science college for Cambridge – 105science

Cambridge’s newest secondary school will open and start teaching in 2014. Called University Technical College – Cambridge, it will specialise in biomedical and environmental science and technology. The UTC is a state funded school open to students with a flair for science. Today’s show has an exclusive interview with acting principal, Melanie Radford telling us about the school’s innovative curriculum.

The new school will draw its teaching from science led by top name partners and research institutes locally. The £10 million UTC is being built on the edge of the Biomedical Campus in Robinson Way near Addenbrookes Hospital. Analogous to a USA high school, students will start aged fourteen – that’s year 10 or the start of GCSE  or the fourth form if you still think in old money. As they start up, they’ll take just 14 years old students and they will stay to 18 years finishing with A level or the more vocational BTEC qualification, ready for University or a science job. School open days are on the morning of 8th March and 24th May 2014 at the Addenbrooke’s Deakin Centre. For more information on UTC Cambridge, see www.utccambridge.co.uk.

Welcome to the fiftieth Science Show on Cambridge 105!

Fact or fiction?

People need to eat different foods depending on their blood group  – listen in to hear that the hypothesis in the extremely popular book “Eat Right for your Type” (1990) has been discredited.

Are we able to measure the mass of objects as small as a virus or a cell nucleus?  Hear how a new design of sensor chip is making this possible.

What’s on

Food For a Greener Future Conference by Cambridge Carbon Footprint Saturday 08 February 2014, 10:00-18:30 Emmanuel United Reformed Church, Trumpington Street.

●  What do we mean by sustainable food?  – Jess Halliday, City University London
●  Food sovereignty and the fight to reclaim the food system – Dan Iles, World Development Movement
●  Sustainable food projects in the UK – Duncan Williamson, of WWF UK
●  Scotland’s Local Food Revolution – Mike Small of The Fife Diet
●  Workshops More info at www.foodforagreenerfuture.org http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/50022

Electronics from Molecules Wednesday 05 February 2014, 21:00-22:00 Nihon Room, Pembroke College. Richard Friend will take us from research on plastic semiconductors and quantum mechanics through to their commercialisation http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/49951

Nanotechnology in healthcare: turning science fiction into science fact – Dr Luis Garcia-Gancedo, Electrical Engineering, University of Cambridge Friday 31 January 2014, 6:15 PM Seminar Room, Wolfson College. Nanotechnology has a role to play in the development of healthcare tools. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/49551

When is a controlled experiment not a controlled experiment? Tuesday 28 January 2014, 21:00-21:30, Senior Parlour, Gonville & Caius College. Richard Jennings will discuss the controversy over the safety of GM foods http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/48676

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Screening for prostate cancer with Dr Hayley Whitaker – 105science

Dr Hayley Whitaker is a Cancer Research UK scientist who specialises in prostate cancer. We hear about her quest for better screening for the disease. Dr Whitaker is lead author of a study about how a particular protein helps identify if a prostate cancer patient needs more intense treatment. The protein is called NAALADL2 and is linked to the spread of prostate cancer tumour cells to surrounding healthy tissues. Every year 41,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK. Dr Whitaker hopes that a test for the protein may spare patients unnecessary treatment.

To learn more about research at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute click here. To read Dr Whitaker’s research article in Oncogene click here

Followed by Science What’s On in January 2014

 

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Influenza: the flu, the virus and the vaccine with Professor Derek Smith – 105science

Professor Derek Smith of Cambridge University tells how flu, also known as Influenza, so successfully eludes the immune system.

In times when cancers can be treated, FLU or INFLUENZA continues to infect vast numbers of people. And why is it that the FLU VACCINE you had years ago offers little immunity against getting the flu again? Did you know you’ve a 1 in 10 chance of getting the flu?

Derek Smith is a Professor of Infectious Disease Informatics at Cambridge University. He is also the Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Modelling, Evolution and Control of Emerging Infectious diseases. Smith uses a method called antigenic cartography to study the phenotypic evolution of rapidly evolving pathogens.

  • See http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/research-reveals-details-of-how-flu-evolves-to-escape-immunity
  • Cambridge Infectious Diseases – resource for infectious disease research http://www.infectiousdisease.cam.ac.uk/news
Quiz
  • Is it Science Fact or Fiction that when you have the flu, getting an antibiotic prescription can help you get better faster?
  • What are antiviral medicines?
  • Is it Science Fact or Fiction that getting a flu vaccination GIVES you the flu?

See Chris Creese’s link to flu myths: check out www.nsh.uk/livewell/winterhealth/pages/flu-myths.aspx

 

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Exploring and modelling the atmosphere – 105science

At the Centre for Atmospheric Science in Cambridge University we speak to Professor John Pyle about modelling the lower atmosphere using supercomputers. See www.atm.ch.cam.ac.uk

Dr Ingrid Cnossen is an earth scientist who works for the British Antarctic Survey. She studies the ionosphere, a layer of the atmosphere where satellites orbit the earth. Find more of her work here

Science what’s on this week

  • Every Wednesday from 7:00pm – 9:00pm there is a public open evening, with a talk and, weather permitting, observation of the sky. At the Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road on the west of Cambridge.
  • Sat 30 November / Sun 1 December from 10:00am – 5:00pm. The Cambridge Science Centre presents an extraordinary sensory experience. The new exhibition, Perception, will use illusions to uncover how our senses and brain work and the tricks your brain uses to make sense of the world.
  • Monday 02 December 2013, 19:30-21:00 Do We Really Need Pandas? The impact of human intervention on natural selection led by Dr Ken Thompson, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield. Venue: Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Churchill College, Storey’s Way, Cambridge. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/48242

The next Science Show is Saturday 14th December at 3.30PM.

In the meantime, connect with us on Twitter @105science.

You can also email us with your ideas, questions, and science events to promote science@cambridge105.fm

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Dr Mark Larché and new hope for allergy sufferers – 105science

A UK biotechnology company has been testing vaccines for common allergies. The vaccines use SPIREs (synthetic peptides that regulate immune system cells) to help people fend off their allergies to cats, grasses and dust mites. The Science Show’s Chris Creese spoke with Professor Mark Larché who is leading these clinical trials.

Want to learn more?

 

Science what’s on in Cambridge

Theatre group Making Good Theatre present The Unsung Heroine of the Double Helix a play by Rani Drew. Rosalind Franklin was an x-ray crystallographer who produced the famous Photo 51 of DNA. The play tells the story of Franklin, who folklore says produced a critical bit of evidence that led to the discovery of how DNA was arranged in a Double Helix. Her work was unacknowledged at the time, while two Cambridge guys got the credit. No need to book. Turn up at 7.30 pm on Wed 27, Thu 28, Fri 29 & Sat 30 November at the Faculty of English, 9 West Road, Cambridge.

Can you believe your eyes? is part workshop – part discussion at the Cambridge Science Centre on Jesus Lane on Thursday 28th November. At this evening event, you try some hands-on activities with visual illusions that test and trick your perception. That’s followed by an informal discussion about current vision research with scientists, clinicians and people who themselves are grappling with altered senses. From 7:00 – 9:00pm.

Eyespots and scents on butterfly wings is on Thursday 21 November. Paul Brakefield, Director of the Cambridge Museum of Zoology, will tell  how the eye-like markings on butterflies and moths, help them to evade their predators. He will explain how the wing “eyespots” are actually laid down before the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis. He will also talk about the scents produced in the wings during courtship.
That’s at 7.30pm at the Lord Ashcroft Building – in the centre of Anglia Ruskin University  (LAB 027)

The Institute of Astronomy hosts a weekly talk every Wednesday. You’ll be able to look through their big telescopes. There’ll be people from the Cambridge Astronomical Association to guide you through what’s to see. Doors open at 6.45pm. It starts at 7:00pm and runs till 9:00pm. The fun is very weather-dependent. Every week on the West Cambridge site in the Hoyle Building

Man’s station in the universe: a scientist’s spiritual journey happens on Thursday 21 November at Clare College. It’s run by the Cambridge University Bahá’í Society. 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Pathogens in the pub – an informal conference but in a pub setting happens on Tuesday 19 November at the The Maypole Pub. Come and Listen to early-career scientists talk about pathogens while sipping a hopefully sterile favourite drink.* Cost: free 8:00pm – 9:30pm

*Chris adds “Did you know that ice cubes from most of Britain’s high street restaurants have MORE bacteria than water from the toilets? Yikes! Now that’s what I call pathogens in the pub!” Read more about it in the Daily Mail.

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The ionosphere – 105science

Dr Ingrid Cnossen is an earth scientist who works for the British Antarctic Survey. She studies the ionosphere, a layer of the upper atmosphere where satellites orbit the earth.

Related  podcasts from other shows

  • Professor John Pyle works on very different models of the atmosphere at the Centre for Atmospheric Science at Cambridge University. Listen to the podcast from January 2013 http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/science-show-26-01-2013/
  • British Antarctic Survey scientist Dr. Robert Mulvaney tells Roger Frost how BAS scientists use drilled ice ‘cores’ to discover how the world’s air has changed. Listen to the podcast September 2012 http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/science-show-22-09-2012/
  • Dr Alastair Graham tells of the unusual life around hydrothermal vents found deep undersea. Listen at the podcast from March 2012 – http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/the-science-show-100312/

Science Facts or Fiction?

What’s on in Cambridge UK, October – November 2013

  • Chain Reaction at the Corn Exchange on 9th November 2013. Families and schools come together to build crazy contraptions, in a chain so that they trigger one another. Tickets from the CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE CENTRE on Jesus Lane.
  • Naked: Art and anatomy – an evening of life drawing but with “a techno-twist”. Cambridge Science Centre on Jesus Lane on Thursday, 31st October
  • The International Space Station is an orbiting space laboratory and the lecture will be about how it works, the research they do and how the crew lives. That’s on 30th October at 6pm at the Cambridge University Computer Laboratory, West Cambridge site.
  • “Electric cars They’re rubbish aren’t they?” a talk by TV actor Robert Llewelyn. Is it really true that electric cars take forever to charge, cost a fortune to buy and they are glorified golf carts? Run by Cambridge Skeptics in the Pub on Tuesday 29th OCTOBER at 7pm in The Maypole Pub at Portugal Place. Tickets cost £3 http://www.wegottickets.com/event/239162
  • Dr Julia Gog, University of Cambridge tells about challenges in modelling influenza on Wednesday 23 October 7PM in the Department of Plant Sciences http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/47069
  • What Cognitive Science can tell us about Chemistry? Michelle Ellefson on Tuesday 22nd October, at 9PM in Senior Parlour of Gonville & Caius College. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/46946
  • Dr Eric Rees, Department of Chemical Engineering, Cambridge talks about super-resolution light Microscopy. Tuesday 22 October 8PM on Tennis Court Road. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/47834
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Reducing heat loss from houses -105science

A scientific look at ways to reduce our use of energy in the home while still staying warm! We’ll meet a building scientist and ask how does a house lose heat? On the same theme, we take an infra red camera on the streets and use it to measure the temperature of the outside walls of a house and see which walls and windows waste heat.

Science Show reporter Nicola Terry asked a local environmental scientist Dr Ray Galvin to tell us about houses and heat loss. Nicola also hitches a ride on the Heatseekers vehicle in Cambridge. Heatseeker Dawn Morley explained how her infra red camera can see the heat escaping from homes.

On 18th October, you can join in to Stand Up To Cancer. Cancer Research UK is asking us to Stand Up To Cancer – literally – to stand for as long as we can or want to, on the 18thOctober to raise money for lifesaving research. To make a difference, just slap on the Stand Up To Cancer bum badge and collect donationshttp://www.standuptocancer.org.uk/get-involved

Cancer research in the news

Exercise fights cancer! Hildebrand and colleagues show that even moderate physical activity is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. The secret is to walk at least one hour per day. Longer walks and more vigorous exercise further reduce breast cancer risk. http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/22/10/1906.full

Inject the nipple spare the body. The Journal of Visualized Experiments just published a new technique for treating and preventing breast cancer to avoid damage to healthy parts of the body. See how it works: http://www.jove.com/video/50692/intraductal-injection-for-localized-drug-delivery-to-mouse-mammary

WHAT’S ON

Thursday 10 October, a talk about “Concorde”, the airplane. There has never been another civil or military aircraft, which can do what Concorde did. There are aircraft that can fly faster, fly higher, fly further or carry more people. But none of them could fly one hundred passengers at Mach 2 across the Atlantic, without refuelling, in just over three hours. Concorde was and still is, an icon. David Rowland will trace the origins of Concorde the aircraft and explain why it was such a huge engineering achievement. “Concorde – a Real Life Time Machine is on Thursday 10 October, 19:00 Engineering Department on Trumpington Street, Cambridge. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/47534

Thursday 10 October 2013, AT 7 pm “Practically Making the Philosophers’ Stone: Recreating Alchemical Experiments” a talk by Dr Jennifer Rampling from the Dept of History of Science, Cambridge University. Dr Rampling is interested in the history of alchemy, medicine and natural philosophy and early modern European intellectual history. This will be at the Department of Chemistry on Lensfield Road.

Saturday 12 October is Big Biology day. Big Biology Day, is the local offering for National Biology Week and it’s back for a second year. Go along to Hills Road Sixth Form College to find members of the public, groups from schools, supported by the Society of Biology and the University running hands-on activities and demonstrations. There will also be a Zoo in a bus. It’s open to everyone, and there’s no need to book or pay money. Big Biology day link: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/whatson/detail.shtml?uid=f095406f-5f71-40ec-9664-d3af26b47897

On Tuesday 22 October 21:00 What can Cognitive Science tell us about Chemistry?
We rarely see substances reacting with each other. Most reactions such petrol burning ; metal rusting are explainable only with specialized knowledge of its hidden mechanisms. Talk by Michelle Ellefson on Tuesday 22 October, 21:00-21:30 Senior Parlour, Gonville & Caius College.

Related Science Show podcasts

Home energy – heat pumps – David Crowther in Cambridge explains how a heat pump, underfloor heating and good insulation keep the house warm. Podcast – January 2012 http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/the-science-show-190212/)

Home energy – infrared cameras – Dawn Morley of ‘Heat Seekers’ who explains how their infra red camera in a van is able to ‘see’ where a house loses its heat. Contact Heat Seekers on 0800 111 4968 or go to www.homeheatseekers.co.uk. Podcast March 2012 http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/the-science-show-100312/

Home energy – Cambridge’s eco-homes – Roger Frost visits a super-insulated city Eco-home that minimises its use of energy; has a garden for insulation on the roof. He talks to architect Jeremy Ashworth about the ways that his building saves energy. Thanks to Ashworth Parkes Architects Limited http://www.ashworthparkes.co.uk

Behind the scenes of Cambridge’s OPEN ECO HOMES event where over two weekends the public are invited on tours of 25 local properties to hear about measures taken to reduce their energy use. Thanks to http://cambridgecarbonfootprint.org/ Podcast May 2012 http://cambridge105.fm/podcasts/the-science-show-05-05-2012/

Home energy – solar panel experts tell Chris Creese about their special panels and offer some smart ideas for using solar energy. Pete McKeown, Director of Cernunnos Homes (http://www.cernunnos-homes.co.uk/) and Hamish Watson, Director of Polysolar (http://www.polysolar.co.uk). Podcast October 2012

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The big questions in science – 105science

Answers to the most intriguing questions in science today. The author of a riveting book called “The Big Questions in Science” explains how they researched How did life begin? Why do we dream? And when can I have a robot butler?

For a teaser of the book, check out this article on The Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/01/20-big-questions-in-science

The Big Questions in Science

Science writer Mun Keat Looi talks about some of the most exciting and pressing questions facing humanity. Mun Keat explains how he and coauthors Hayley Birch and Colin Stuart gathered the most cutting edge science research to shed new light on the twenty biggest questions keeping us up at night, such as How did life begin? And are we alone in the universe? The authors explain everything in a way that’s easy to understand – helped by quite stunning photography and funny cartoon drawings.

 

To pick up your own copy of ‘The Big Questions in Science: The Quest to Solve the Great Unknowns’:  http://www.goodmanbooks.com/books/products/the-big-questions-in-science

Mun Keat Looi works on other projects too. To get in touch, check out his website: http://munkeatlooi.com

What’s On

‘When Magic and Science Collide’ on Tuesday 24th September 19:00 at The Maypole Pub. A talk from the Skeptics in the Pub series. Oliver Meech performs brain-boggling tricks inspired by mind-boggling science in a comedy magic show that fuses psychology and trickery. http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/45053

The Next Science Show is on Saturday 28th September at our NEW TIME of 3.30 pm.

Follow us on twitter @105science.

Email us your science questions, news, and events at SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

 

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Preserving ugly animals – plus breeding better wheat – 105science

Hear about breeding plants commercially and a fun campaign to save the ‘ugly’ animals.

Simon Watt of the Ugly Animal Preservation Society tell us that ugly animals face extinction because the cute creatures, like cuddly pandas, “steal all the glory”. He tells how everyone has a chance to vote for their ‘favourite ugly animal’.

See http://uglyanimalsoc.com or http://www.youtube.com/uglyanimal

To learn more about Simon Watt, you can visit his online home at http://www.readysteadyscience.com

Breeding wheat

You may wonder how today’s farmers are able to grow wheat reliably. We talk with plant scientist Gillian Covey, who explains how different strains of wheat can be bred to make better seeds for farmers. We learn some of techniques available to plant breeders, such as ‘single cross’ and ‘doubled haploids’.

Gillian Covey is a specialist in Spring Wheat at KWS UK, south of Cambridge in the village of Thriplow. KWS UK provide growers with innovative varieties of wheat, maize, oilseed rape, and sugar beet to meet needs of a varied market. Find out about spring wheat at KWS-UK

What’s On

The Ugly Animals – Comedy night at the Portland Arms, Cambridge with Sarah Bennetto, Punk Science, Andrew Holding, Suzi Ruffell, Iszi Lawrence and AF Harrold. For tickets, details of other events see http://uglyanimalsoc.com/book-tickets

Next Science Show: 3.30pm Saturday 21/09/2013 on Cambridge 105

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Helping farmers keep water supplies pollution-free – 105science

A government initiative to help farmers keep the water supply free of pollutants. We visit a farm in Duxford, England where Andrew Down from ‘Natural England’ explains what is meant by “Catchment Sensitive Farming”. Read more at http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/csf

Environment is such an issue today, it much has its own forces to fight its different battles. ‘Natural England’ is an NGO and they connect with the Environment Agency, Rural Development Programme and with DEFRA – the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Questions from this show’s SCIENCE FACT or FICTION section:

  • Do teenage drivers make FEWER driving mistakes while listening to music?
  • Can charity work and other ways to give back to the community prolong your life?
  • Do women who receive midwife care throughout their pregnancy experience more successful births?
  • Can a plant make its own fertilizer?
  • Could regular exercise prevent problems in the bedroom?

The Next Science Show is on Saturday 7th September at the very NEW TIME of 3.30 pm. Follow us on twitter @105science. Email us your science questions, news, and events at SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

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A DNA cocktail; research on your body clock plus hands on at the Cambridge Science Centre – 105science

A DNA drink to enjoy in the sun, how camping can reset your biological clock, and why the Cambridge Science Centre is the place to take the kids this summer! The Science Centre tell us how to make a lemon battery and about their “Chain Reaction” event in November.

The Science Show is on Saturday at a NEW TIME of 3.30 pm. Follow us on twitter @105science. Email us your science questions, news, and events at SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

Inside the Cambridge Science Centre

Wondering how to entertain the kids before they head back to school? Chris Creese takes a trip to the Cambridge Science Centre on 18 Jesus Lane to see what events they have to tickle your science bone. Learn how to make a lemon battery at home – it’s easier than you think and could even power your iPod!  Chris also tours the exhibits and hears from patrons about the fun and excitement of hands-on science. A chat with presenter and outreach manager Rosy Ansell gives an inside view into science outreach. Rosy also talks about the “Chain Reaction” event you’re invited to at the Corn Exchange on 9th November. Click for more information about Chain Reaction.

Science News

Chris and Roger discuss the merits of camping to get away from electricity and improve sleep.

Still curious? Check out these articles:

 

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SmartPill comes to Cambridge and we play the Science Fact and Fiction quiz – 105science

A new pill can diagnose you from the inside out. A new medical procedure offers an innovative way for doctors to find out what’s going on inside the intestine. The ‘SmartPill’ is a tablet-sized device with sensors to take measurements inside your gut and transmit them wirelessly outside the body. This procedure is now available at the private Spire Cambridge Lea Hospital in Impington. We speak to consultant physician, Dr Stephen Middleton about the technology and its benefits. To learn more, click here.

Play the Science Fact or Fiction quiz

and learn whether the moon affects our sleep, if a breathalyser can tell you’re burning fat, and if today’s thin film technology is really the best. Still curious? Check out the research articles:

What’s On

The beach at Sedgwick Museum  31 July, 10.30am — 3.30pm Sedgwick Museum, Downing Street, Free. Sun, sand, fossils and fun! Discover the creatures of the seaside from prehistoric times to the current day. Drop in for a seaside adventure or book a place on a special session: museumeducation@esc.cam.ac.uk  Fossil Hunt 11am – 12pm and Sedgwick Stories 2pm – 3pm

Make a sundial  31 July, 12.30 — 4.30pm Whipple Museum, Free School Lane, No need to book, Free. Before smartphones and watches, people used the sun and the stars to tell the time. Discover how it was done and make your own dials.

Rockets and cranes  7 August, 10am — 12.30pm Cambridge Museum of Technology, Cheddars Lane, Free. Design and make your own cranes and rockets! We’ll test the cranes to breaking point and fire the rockets into the air. Suitable for age 7+. Pre book email: info@museumoftechnology.com

Email your science questions, news, and events to SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

The Science Show 27/07/2013 – next show on Cambridge 105, Saturday 10th August at 2.30pm. Follow us on Twitter @105science.

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Introduction to anaesthesiology – we visit the Royal Society summer science exhibition – 105science

Hear about the wonders of anaesthesia. Have you ever had surgery in an operating theatre? If like us you wondered what the anaesthetist does, listen in to hear Dr Jessica Kentish tell us what her work entails. We met Dr Kentish on her holiday to Cambridge, UK and she told us about the chemicals she uses in her work in Denver, Colorado. The Dr goes on to explain why nitrous oxide, normally used as an anaesthetic in dentistry, is less useful at high altitudes.

The Summer Science Exhibition at the Royal Society in London is an amazing venue to let your ‘inner scientist’ out to play! The 2013 summer science exhibition was bustling with folks and families and wanting to hear what scientists get up to. It was a week long chance to chat with some of the UK’s greatest scientists, and to do experiments right along with them! There were exhibits, cafés, comedy shows and cocktail hours. The science show’s Dr Chris Creese catches us up on loads of cool science from how essential oils kill bacteria, to Olympic sport science, and 3D tissue regeneration.

You can still get in on the fun by checking out podcasts and videos at the Royal Society exhibition blog http://summer-science.tumblr.com

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Molecular biology research at the Medical Research Council lab of Molecular Biology in Cambridge – 105science

The Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge is credited for landmark discoveries and cutting-edge techniques. This podcast offers an overview of what the LMB do, as the Science Show team visit the lab.

On the occasion of the Medical Research Council centenary, and a visit by HRH The Queen, Roger Frost speaks with the director of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Sir Hugh Pelham about the kind of research they undertake. We find out how the LMB choose what’s worth investigating.

The LMB houses 50 research groups and over 400 scientists and one of them is led by scientist Dr Melina Schuh. Her special topic is meiosis in mammalian oocytes, or how we make the eggs that make our babies. Roger was intrigued to know why we need to know more about making babies. So we visited to ask Melina what the interest was about.

In the final part of the program Dr Chris Creese and Roger tour the LMB-MRC open day exhibition and learn about body clocks and worms. Read more at Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

Next live Science Show is at 2.30pm on 13th July 2013 at www.cambridge105.fm

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Keeping bees, honey and making chocolate – 105science

Keeping bees and making honey: Long-time beekeeper Steve Poyser tells us how honey bees work and how nectar turns into the stuff we buy. The Science Show’s Roger Frost asks about clear versus creamed honey. He also wonders why honey bees are called ‘social insects’ when the bee at his last BBQ was more anti-social than social. Steve Poyser is an active member of Cambridgeshire Beekeepers’ Association: www.cbka.uk/

Artistry in Cocoa – Making Chocolate: Newmarket town centre chocolatier Cheryl Brighty talks to Nicola Terry about the cocoa pod and how she controls the setting of chocolate to ensure the best quality. Cheryl Brighty runs Artistry in Cocoa: www.artistryincocoa.co.uk.

Don’t miss: 20 – 29 June 2013, Cambridge Medical Research Council – MRC Open Week: To celebrate the MRC’s 100th birthday, scientists across the country throw open their lab doors to give visitors a taste of some of the awe-inspiring science that goes on in our establishments: http://www2.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/openweek/

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Research into cocaine addiction – 105science

COCAINE ADDICTION is DIFFERENT. Dr Karen Ersche tells about her research into cocaine addiction. The work investigates the finding that cocaine addiction affects some people and not others. Also, unlike other addictions, there are no substitute chemicals that can be used in cocaine addiction. However Karen Ersche’s research is looking at a possible candidate. The Science Show’s Roger Frost asks about the use of terms such as addiction; habit and compulsive behaviour.

Karen works at the Department  of Psychiatry in the School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge: www.psychiatry.cam.ac.uk/

Followed by Fact or Fiction with Chris Creese talking on cosmetic uses of cat litter and the statistics of being bitten by a shark or having a coconut fall on you.

WHAT’S ON

  • The Cambridge Science Centre on Jesus Lane is open daily. kids especially  welcome. Subsidised admission for all.
  • The Cambridge Science Cente half-term programme runs from 25 May – 2 June 2013.  The centre will run a workshop throughout the week in which you’ll be able to build your own pinhole camera and find out more about how your own eyes work. You can book your place at www.cambridgesciencecentre.org
  • The Cambridge Science Centre is hosting a teachers evening gathering on 18 June 2013. 
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The science of archaeology – 105science

Dr John Creese tells about the science of archaeology and the investigative techniques they use. Dr Creese is a researcher at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. Website: www.mcdonald.cam.ac.uk/. Interviewer Roger Frost asks how is archaeology distinguished from history which is surely not a science?

Followed by The Science Show’s Chris answering this week’s science question from Stewart: What’s the science behind the idea of using helium to pack parcels and save on postage costs.

The next Science Show is on 18th May 2013. Follow us on Twitter @105science.

What’s on
• On Wednesday 15 May 2013 at 6pm there is a Science and Society event where you can hear about advances in scientific research and discuss how this work impacts on us. Called “From habit to addiction: A slippery slope” with speakers from from King’s College London and Cambridge, UK, this seminar-type event is being run by the European Bioinformatics Institute. Go to Cambridge Union Society, on Bridge Street, Cambridge on Wednesday 15 May 2013, from 6pm till 9:15pm. You can follow the event on twitter: #scisoc
• Starting on Tuesday 14th May through to Thursday 16th May 2013 is a 3-day Cambridge Science Festival, with nine evening events in three pubs, called A PINT OF SCIENCE. Top scientists give talks in pubs around town. The Brain (addiction and music) is the topic at The Portland Arms in Chesterton Road. The Body (vaccines; tumours and infection) at the Panton Arms in Panton Street. Biotechnology (stem cells and microorganisms for fuel in the future) is at the Avery pub in Regent Street. See the website: www.pintofscience.com where you can get the details of 9 connected events and book your place for free. The evenings all begin at 7pm.

 

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Author of ‘Evolution and Belief’ tells why understanding evolution is less of a challenge to religious belief, and doesn’t make people into atheists – 105science

Dr Rob Asher shares evidence for the evolution of animals and sheds light on misunderstandings about science and religion. We also consider whether religious explanations of the natural world ought be included in school science education; whether teachers can be unaffected by their own beliefs and that science and religion do not explain the same things.

Dr Rob Asher is a lecturer and curator of vertebrates at the Cambridge Museum of Zoology. His recommended reading list:
Wallace Arthur: Evolution A Developmental Approach, Biased Embryos & Evolution
Sean Carroll: Endless Forms Most Beautiful, Making of the Fittest
Francis Collins: Language of God
Ken Miller: Finding Darwin’s God
Neil Shubin: Your Inner Fish

What’s on in Cambridge, England

Monday 22nd April 2013 from 6:00pm – The Polar Museum celebrate Earth Day with a free premiere of the film ‘Thin Ice: The Inside Story of Climate Science’. The film shows the astonishing scientific endeavour needed to understand climate change. Venue: The Polar Museum on Lensfield Road, Cambridge

Tuesday the 23rd April 2013 6:30 pm: a talk about Ink jet technology, which has come to be important for not just printing but also in electronics, solar panels, smart textiles and of course 3D printing. Industry expert Mike Willis will illustrate the achievements of the ink jet as it began in Cambridge, and also describe today’s nanotechnology processes. Venue: the Institute for Manufacturing, Charles Babbage Road.

Thursday 25th April 2013 – Natural History conservation evening with Tony Juniper and Andrew Balmford, author of Wild Hope, who chatted with us here on the science show. Great chap. Andrew and Tony will offer positive examples of conservation to inspire us towards a world of more balanced coexistence with nature. Venue: Heffers Book shop. Cost £6, details at.cam.ac.uk/whatson

Tuesday 30th April 7pm : A Skeptics in the Pub talk on Anthroposophy and Spiritual Science. This looks at the beliefs of the highly influential Rudolf Steiner, the founder of this occult movement. Steiner was a mystic who believed he had clairvoyant access to cosmic knowledge. He developed a belief system based on karma, reincarnation, astrology, and homeopathy. The talk describes the movement and discusses how it impacts on public life. Venue: the Maypole Pub, Portugal Place, Cambridge, UK

Tuesday 7th of May 7pm: A slice of Raspberry Pi – a talk about a powerful computer you can now buy in the shops, that looks like a piece of circuit board rather than a system box. One of the creators of the Raspberry Pi, Eben Upton, explains the design brief to make a computer so affordable that every child in Britain could have one. He’ll discuss the staggering response to the Raspberry Pi. At the Institute of Continuing Education in Madingley Hall.

For more info go to the university talks and what’s on websites at talks.cam.ac.uk
OR admin.cam.ac.uk/whatson

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Drug discovery special – 105science

DifiniGEN is a new Cambridge University spin-off company who have a process for growing human liver cells. CEO Dr Marcus Yeo explains how their cells are used by pharmaceutical companies, to test if a newly discovered drug is harmful. The ability to grow special cells from stem cells also offers the possibility for organ replacement in the future. The techniques used come from the Nobel Prize winning work of the university’s Sir John Gurdon. See www.definigen.com
We also hear how medicines are being developed here in Cambridge. We talk to Sean McKenna, a chemistry expert working in the industry.

In both cases we think you will be intrigued by techniques that take some of the guesswork out of making pills that do us more good than harm.

The Science Show is produced by Roger Frost and Chris Creese who meet the scientists and get the inside scoop on science, especially when it happens in Cambridge.

Follow us on Twitter @105science.
Contact us with your science questions and events science@cambridge105.FM

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A Cambridge chemist talks about drug discovery. Plus ‘Cambattery’ building a better battery – 105science

How drugs for medicine are discovered and improved by chemistry. Sean McKenna, a scientist in the pharmaceutical industry, describes techniques that take the guesswork out of making pills. Followed by:

What’s on in Cambridge
The new Cambridge Science Centre is open. Take yourself or the kids to Jesus Lane, try some experiments and surprise yourself. Daily. See www.cambridgesciencecentre.org for details. Opposite Friends Meeting House / ADC theatre / Park Street car park.

Rolling out energy efficiency for homes and community buildings A workshop on what can be done to upgrade buildings, schools, churches to save energy. What can be done? How can it be financed and who can do the work? Nicola Terry (from Transition Cambridge & Cambridge Carbon Footprint) will illustrate the workshop with local projects such as Cambridge Open Eco Homes, the e-Coton solar panel bulk buy and Rampton Drift. Go to the workshop and come away with an understanding of how to make your project a success. Wednesday 03 April at 7 till 9pm. Stoneyard Centre (Lower hall), 43 St Andrews Street.

Feeling the weather in your bones: Why do people with broken bones or arthritis feel pain when the weather changes? In 2007, researchers at Tufts University in Boston reported that every 10-degree drop in temperature corresponded with an increase in pain by arthritis sufferers. Increased air pressure also triggered pain in the study.
http://www.arthritistoday.org/symptoms/pain/all-about-pain/weather-pain.php
http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/features/weather_and_pain?page=2

Building a better battery: A new battery technology, based on inexpensive sulphur, promises to double the electrical energy that can be stored at a lower cost. A Cambridge start-up, ‘Cambattery” is working to commercialise the technology.
http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/building-a-better-battery

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Cambridge Science Festival Preview – 105science

In the Cambridge Science Festival, Nick Crumpton tells why mammals are better than dinosaurs. And researcher Dr Andrew Holding tells of the Skeptics in the Pub discussion group and of Bright Club, where scientists collide with humour.

The next Science Show will be on 23rd March 2013 at 2.30pm on Cambridge 105. Listen on your web browser or wireless.

Guests in this Podcast:

Dr Andrew Holding

Nick Crumpton

Events in March 2013:

The Cambridge Science Festival will run from the 11th to the 24th March 2013. For the schedule of events and bookings, go to their website: www.cam.ac.uk/sciencefestival

On 17th March Cambridge Science Centre offers Sunday Science where families can meet budding scientists and engineers to hear about their work. http://www.cambridgesciencecentre.org/whats-on/events/sunday-science/

On 19th March Cambridge Science Centre runs Late Night Lab for adults at 18 Jesus Lane.  http://www.cambridgesciencecentre.org/whats-on/events/late-night-lab-next-generation/

On 23rd March 1pm join the Cambridge Science Centre visit to the Institute for Manufacturing for a fun day of making things fly in their wind tunnel. See www.cambridgesciencecentre.org

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Researching the invertebrate that lives in puddles: bdelloid rotifer – 105science

Professor Alan Tunnacliffe of the Cambridge University Department of Chemical Engineering tells why the bdelloid rotifer has fascinated top biologists. This microscopically tiny invertebrate lives in rain puddles. The creature can survive without water for millions of years, and by now really ought to be extinct. Our guest scientist tells why it isn’t and how it manages its DNA.  To learn more: www.ceb.cam.ac.uk/pages/bdelloid-rotifers.html. More links for this weeks guest scientist

THE NEXT SCIENCE SHOW is on Saturday 9th March at 2.30pm on Cambridge 105FM. Listen on your web browser or wireless. Follow us on Twitter @105science. Write to us at science@cambridge105.fm

SCIENCE NEWS

ZOMBIE CELLS: Bryan Kaehr and colleagues at the Sandia National Laboratories have found way to capture the shape of living cells using silica. They pour silicic acid onto cells in a dish, and heat them to 400 degrees Celsius to evaporate the organic material and set the silica. And this leaves a  replica of the living mammalian cell with all of its nuances of shape. They coat the replica with gold, visualise it using a scanning electron microscope to see amazing architectural detail including curves of their DNA. Scientists hope their process might also be useful for fuel cells; sensor technology and growing nanotechnology. Related links:
http://artplant.wikia.com/wiki/Zombie_cell
http://science.energy.gov/news/in-focus/2013/02-13-13/

ORGANIC NUTRITION: It’s commonly assumed that organically grown produce can be more nutritious than the other stuff. A study from researchers at the Federal University of Ceara in Brazil claims that organically grown tomatoes have more vitamin C, in other words, they’re more nutritious. This echoes results published in 2011 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, which showed higher concentrations of vitamin C and phenols in organic crops compared with conventionally grown crops. Related links: http://www.myhealthnewsdaily.com/3554-organic-tomatoes-nutrition.html

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0056354

WHAT’S ON  Clear your diaries, the Cambridge Science Festival will run from the 11th to the 24th of March. To peruse the schedule of events and make a booking, go to their website: www.cam.ac.uk/sciencefestival. We have pulled some events you might see:

o  Professor Alistair McGrath will discuss the relationship between Christianity and science, focusing especially on debates raised by atheists such as Richard Dawkins. Monday 11th March at 7:45 PM
o  Join a panel of experts who consider the costs of conservation. They discuss how we put a price on existence of species and ecosystems on Monday 11th March at 8 PM
o  The new Cambridge Science Centre provides hands-on science and interactive exhibits, workshops and demos and is now open 7 days aweek. Visit their new venue on Jesus Lane from Tuesday 12th March
o  The Polar Museum presents a panel discussion by leading experts on research in Antarctica.on Tuesday 12th March at 6 PM
o  Learn how astronomers can study planets by analysing meteorites with a microscope. “Astronomy by microscope” is on Tuesday at 6 PM
o  Discover extremes of the universe and wonder what it’s like on other planets. If you like loud bangs and a mess, reserve your Friday
15th March at 7 PM
o  Wonder if we can and should live forever? The issues of immortality will be discussed by biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey, biochemist Guy Brown, and philosopher Stephen Cave on Friday 15th March at 7 PM
o  Discover your body composition and use infrared technology to compare your body’s distribution of fat, tissue and water to that of athletes. That’s on Saturday 16th March

Details at the website www.cam.ac.uk/sciencefestival

 

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DifiniGEN are experts in human cell production. We talk to Dr Marcus Yeo about how this benefits drug development – 105science

Dr Marcus Yeo is from DifiniGEN, a new Cambridge company that grows liver cells to test if new drugs are harmful. Their technology comes from the Nobel Prize-winning work of Cambridge university’s Sir John Gurdon. And there’s a seriously possible use for organ replacement in the future. See www.definigen.com

You can also play along in our Science Fact or Fiction quiz:

  • Might rubbing kitty litter on your face be a good thing?
  • Is it helpful for slow loris primates to give their children poison?
  • Are more people injured by coconuts than are attacked by sharks?

THE NEXT SCIENCE SHOW will be on Saturday 23rd February at 2.30 pm

For updates follow us on twitter @105science. Email us your ideas and science questions science@cambridge105.fm

What’s on

For upcoming talks see www.talks.cam.ac.uk

Clear your diaries and corral your kids, the Cambridge Science Festival runs from 11 – 24 March, 2013! See www.cam.ac.uk/sciencefestival

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Modelling chemistry of the atmosphere – 105science

We visit the Centre for Atmospheric Science in Cambridge University and speak to Professor John Pyle about modelling the atmosphere using supercomputers. See www.atm.ch.cam.ac.uk

We talk about Norovirus and how to avoid it. See www.sturff.org

We also reflect on New Year’s resolutions to eat what’s good for us in our Science Fact or Fiction quiz – play along!

  • Would eating more eggs increase our blood cholesterol?
  • Why might modern eggs be better for us than eggs of years ago?
  • Tea contains antioxidants, but for how long should we steep our tea to get them?
  • Is there such a thing as ‘too much’ when it comes to antioxidants?
  • Are baked beans healthy and do they really make us more metaphorically musical?
  • Why do Mexican jumping beans jump?

Next Science Show on Cambridge 105 will be on Saturday February 9th at 2:30pm. If you want a reminder of that follow us on twitter @105science.

If you have a science event or a idea to share email us. science@cambridge105.fm

What’s on

For a list of all talks, see www.talks.cam.ac.uk

A Skeptics in the Pub talk: Neil Denny, the presenter of the Little Atoms Radio Show, made a road trip across America and recorded interviews with scientists and science writers. Go to the Maypole Pub on Portugal Place on Tuesday, January 29 at 7:00PM

Kinect – The Inside Story where Mat Cook tells how Microsoft Research Cambridge helped develop the 3D human pose recognition technology known as Kinect. That’s on Friday February 8th at 6pm at The Old Combination Room (OCR), Wolfson College.

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Psychology interviews including a social psychologist and also Cambridge Cognition – 105science

Happy new year from the Science Show!  With a nod to new years resolutions, we’ve put together a psychology special on memory and addiction. Experimental psychologist Brianne Kent talks to Chris Creese about Alzheimer’s disease, memory, and why love is a drug. Dr. Jenny Barnett talks to Roger Frost about testing for dementia and shares some tips on how to improve memory.

Brianne Kent is working on a PhD in experimental psychology at the University of Cambridge. She is studying Alzheimer’s disease and finding out how memories form in the brain. Brianne also tells about dopamine, a brain chemical that figures in drug addiction and as we fall in love.

•  To learn more the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, see the Alzheimer Society: http://alzheimers.org.uk/

•  “Your Love is my drug” article by Brianne Kent in BlueSci  http://www.bluesci.org/?p=7474

•  “Why do we love: the nature and chemistry of romantic love“ – a book by Helen Fisher is at Amazon Books http://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-We-Love-Chemistry-Romantic/dp/0805077960

Dr. Jenny Barnett of Cambridge Cognition speaks with Roger Frost about the neuropsychological tests they develop including one designed for the easy and early detection of dementia. Their test is to be used in a government-funded field trial. And she has some advice for how to improve memory.

•  Cambridge Cognition http://www.cantab.com/

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Science Show on Cambridge 105 – link to podcasts

Use this button for a neat, compact Science Show podcast playing window.
Blubrry player!

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Sky jumper Felix Baumgartner’s health monitored by Cambridge company Equivital. We talk to CEO, Anmol Sood – 105science

Our guest Anmol Sood of Hildago was on the team that monitored Felix Baumgartner health as he jumped from the edge of space and reached a speed of over 800 mph. Based in Cambridge UK, the company makes the Equivital Lifemonitor and are expert at handling data from sensors.

See Anmol Sood on BBC Breakfast: www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19958528; Equivital from Hildago http://www.equivital.co.uk

We have you guessing what’s science fact and what’s science fiction:

  • In A Christmas Story, Ralphie dared Flick stick his tongue on a freezing cold pole. Could it really happen that his tongue really got stuck to the pole?
  • Mincemeat pies are a holiday treat, but are they filled with meat?
  • A turkey dinner makes you sleepy because something in the turkey has drugged you?

News: water is found on Mercury – again, but for real it seems www.nytimes.com/2012/11/30/science/space/mercury-home-to-ice-messenger-spacecraft-findings-suggest.html

Next show on Cambridge 105 will be on a freezing cold Saturday 29th December at 2:30pm. So we speak to two British Antarctic Survey scientists in interviews you might have missed this year. If you want a show reminder, follow us on twitter @105science. Write to us at science@cambridge105.fm

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Fact or Fiction on Breakfast Show – 105science

Neil and Lottie invite us to the Breakfast Show on Cambridge 105. Chris and Roger answer questions about the show, and introduce their Science Fact or Fiction quiz. Lots of giggling but useful chat too.

Running order:

  • Introductions; what the Science Show does and why it happens in Cambridge
  • Neil: is Chris American or Canadian?
  • Teaching standards in schools
  • How they taught programming in the old days; What science is taught in school; Raspberry Pi computer
  • Examples of science research and science being commercialised
  • Science Fact or Fiction quiz, followed by answers to:
    • Is it impossible to sneeze with your eyes open?
    • Can peanuts be used to make dynamite?
    • Does the most expensive coffee in the world come from animal poo?
  • The Science Show on Cambridge 105 happens every other Saturday at 2.30pm – on 105FM or www.cambridge105.fm. See links on this page for iTunes podcasts and Twitter feed
  • Length 20 mins approx
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Dr Jenny Barnett of Cambridge Cognition on neuropsychological tests – 105science

Dr Jenny Barnett of Cambridge Cognition speaks about the neuropsychological tests they develop including one designed for the easy and early detection of dementia. Their test is soon to used in a government-funded field trial. Cambridge Cognition http://www.cantab.com/

We also have you guessing whether the following are science fact or science fiction:
Does a male catfish carries itd offspring in his mouth until they hatch?
Is the North Star, Polaris, the brightest star in the night sky of the northern hemisphere?
Are the jungles of Central and South America inhabited by a beetle with headlights on its back?

Amir Amedi from Hebrew University of Jerusalem is developing a technology to help the blind see with their ears. “The vOICe”, is described in in Neuron (Volume 76, Issue 3, 8 November 2012, Pages 640–652). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2012.08.026 http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/nstv/2012/11/seeing-with-sound.html

Events

·         A talk about Econophysics Since the economic crisis, people have concluded that economics has failed. Dr Alex Baldon, University of Manchester introduces a scientific approach to the study of financial markets called econophysics. What does it involve? What does it do right? What does it do wrong? On Monday 26 November 20:00. At Plant Sciences Lecture Theatre, Downing Site. £2 http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/40544

·         Former governmental drug advisor Prof. David Nutt will show why current drug laws limit research and he’’ll show how simple changes in drug regulation could impact on science and medicine. The talk called Time to grow up? is on Tuesday 27 November in the Pharmacology Lecture Theatre on at  20:00

·         Skeptics in the pub offer an evening about homeopaths in East Africa called “Bad Science in the Developing World”.  Martin Robbins, of the Guardian’s Lay Science reports on dangerous practices in East Africa; flat earthers and anti-vaccine campaigns in Nigeria. On Tuesday, 27th November at The Maypole in Portugal Place at 7:00PM. http://cambridge.skepticsinthepub.org/Event.aspx/1247/Bad-Science-in-the-Developing-World

 

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What the Cambridge Science Centre aims to do for science education by Dr Chris Lennard – 105science

The Cambridge Science Centre  is a really useful educational attraction in the city centre. Ahead of its opening, founder Dr Chris Lennard tells Roger Frost what the centre aims to do for science education. The Cambridge Science Centre opens February 2013 at 18 Jesus Lane, Cambridge (near the round church) www.cambridgesciencecentre.org.

What’s on – see talks.cam.ac.uk for details

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Social psychology: does cleanliness affect perception? 105science

University of Cambridge psychology PhD student, Dario Krpan, discusses how the state of our body affects how we perceive things. We consider how feeling more clean might harshen our judgement, and how feeling pious might make us feel more clean. We also play the Science Fact or Fiction game, answer your question about why bees buzz, and catch you up on Cambridge news and science talks.

Science fact or fiction?
• Is the red juice that comes out of rare steak, blood?
• Are paper bags better for the environment than plastic bags?
• Are pet allergies caused by fur?

Cambridge news
• Professor Sir John Gurdon is the 89th Cambridge name to be awarded the Nobel Prize
• Cambridge research offers insight into tuberculosis in cattle

Links

Want to participate in University of Cambridge pyschology studies? Email
study@psychol.cam.ac.ukor phone 0776742319.

Talks – see talks.cam.ac.uk

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Solar panel technology in Cambridge – 105science

Solar panel experts tell Chris Creese about their special panels and offer some smart ideas for using solar energy. Pete McKeown, Director of Cernunnos Homes (http://www.cernunnos-homes.co.uk/) and Hamish Watson, Director of Polysolar (http://www.polysolar.co.uk).

Our new game asks you to tell SCIENCE FACT from SCIENCE FICTION:

· Is there enough salt in ocean to bury all the continents in the world?
· If one person’s blood vessels were put end to end, they would stretch   around the planet?
· If you get cold you can catch a cold?

Listen and compare your answers!

The next Science Show is on 20th August 2012. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/105science

Catch the latest Science Shows:

What’s on – see http://talks.cam.ac.uk and http://www.societyofbiology.org

  • 15 October – Numeracy and the Media a Lost Cause? Statistical Laboratory Professor Spiegelhalter at 20:30 in Trinity College
  • 15 October – Family biology fun day at Hills Road Sixth Form College
  • 16 October – Energy and life – talk by Nobel Laureate Professor Sir John Walker 19.30, Babbage Lecture Theatre
  • 16 October – Molecules of Murder with Dr John Emsley at 20:00 in Department of Pharmacology.
  • 17 October – Genome Generation for teachers at Faculty of Education
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The British Antarctic Survey measure global warming – 105science

Dr. Robert Mulvaney of the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge talks to the Science Show’s Roger Frost who finds out that not all global warming is his fault or ours. We hear how British Antarctic Survey scientists use drill ice to discover how the world has changed over thousands of years.  Story links: 

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19348427
  • http://www.antarctica.ac.uk//bas_research/science/climate/icecore/page1.php
  • http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/press/press_releases/press_release.php?id=1892

Chris Creese catches us up on science news on how printing has evolved with an Inkjet for Living Tissue – WSJ.com http://on.wsj.com/Qh163C. Chris and Roger play a game called ‘Science fact or fiction’. Email your news and questions SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM. Follow us on Twitter @105science to find out what’s on the next show. NEXT SHOW is on Cambridge 105 on Saturday 6th of October at 2:30pm.

EVENTS
Need and Nature of a New Scientific Revolution. A talk by Stephen Emmott of Microsoft Research about over-population and the difficult technological and societal choices we face. It’s followed by a panel discussion, with bioengineering experts Tom Knight, Claire Marris and Jim Haseloff taking questions on Synthetic Biology. On Wednesday September 26th, Dept of Chemistry on Lensfield Road at 5 pm

Conserving the small things that run the world. A talk where Ed Turner reminds us that insects are the most diverse group of organisms on the planet, in serious decline. He’ll share the remarkable diversity of insects and how we can conserve them. On Thursday 4th October, Lord Ashcroft Building, Anglia Ruskin University at 7:30 pm
To learn more about these events see talks.cam.ac.uk

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‘Wild Hope’ – the book on conservation – 105science

Cambridge conservation scientist, Andrew Balmford, says why there’s hope for saving the planet. Speaking to The Science show’s Chris Creese, the author of “Wild Hope” explains what ecosystems really do for us, and how we can help ourselves by helping the environment. Roger Frost shares how liquid cornflour mixed in water behaves like a solid, and may generate a new kind of body armour. And Chris shares how scientists discovered one of the building blocks of life near a young star 400 light years from Earth.

SCIENCE QUESTION  Got allelopathy? Sounds scary, but it’s actually something plants do that can help you in your garden!

NEXT SHOW is on Saturday 22nd September at 2:30pm on Cambridge 105FM

For a reminder, follow us on twitter @105science Email your news and science questions to SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

EVENT  Want to meet the author of “Wild Hope”? Head to Topping & Company on Ely High Street Tuesday October 2. Tickets £5. Reception starts at 7 pm, book signing at 7.30 pm http://www.toppingbooks.co.uk/events/ely/andrew-balmford/

LINKS

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Report from Ecological Society of America conference – 105science

Report from the Ecological Society of America conference in Portland, USA by the Science Show’s Chris Creese. This show features a chat with ‘critical transitions’ expert Marten Scheffer (Netherlands) covering big ideas from his book and a new film collaboration with artist Tone Bjordam.

We also look at two innovative projects where everyday folk and travellers can participate in collecting data needed for ecology research. Chris Creese talks with Jake Weltzin of the National Phenology Network (USA) and Brendan Weiner from ‘Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation’ about how we can all participate in science.

LINKS

NEXT SCIENCE SHOW is on Saturday 8th September at 2:30pm on Cambridge 105FM. For a reminder, follow us on twitter @105science Email news and your science questions to SCIENCE@CAMBRIDGE105.FM

EVENT: Managing your home heating by Transition Cambridge – Thursday 06 September 2012, 19:30-21:00 at United Reform Church http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/39054

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The Raspberry-Pi computer + Involving the public in environmental research – 105science

Raspberry Pi: Cambridge University’s Dr Rob Mullins and Alex Bradbury, developed this inexpensive computer to bump start computing, much like the Acorn BBC Micro did thirty years ago. Chris Creese reports from the Ecological Society of America conference in Portland USA. She has the stories on how the Internet is enabling ordinary people to become get involved in scientific discovery: She talked to Jake Weltzin of the USA National Phenology Network and Brendan Weiner from ‘Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation’ about how we can all get involved in science research.

The Science Show 11/08/2012

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Birds and habitats + Engineering for the world land speed record – 105science

Learn about wetlands and bird habitats as Chris Creese grabs binoculars and speaks with Peter Herkenrath, Chairman of the Cambridgeshire Bird Club. Also in this Science Show Roger Frost finds out about Bloodhound, an engineering initiative for students to build the world’s fastest car. He speaks with Ian Galloway, Bloodhound’s Education Professional Development Director.

The Science Show 28/07/2012

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Purifying water from the energy business + Alzheimer’s disease and memory – 105science

Experimental psychologist Brianne Kent talks to Chris Creese about Alzheimer’s disease; memory and why love is a drug. We also hear from Matt Bruff of Altela Inc, a Denver company making technology that turns the most polluted water into something useful. Brianne Kent is working on a PhD in experimental psychology at the University of Cambridge. She is studying Alzheimer’s disease and finding out how memories form in the brain. Brianne also tells about dopamine, a brain chemical that figures in drug addiction and as we fall in love.

•  To learn more the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, see the Alzheimer Society: http://alzheimers.org.uk/

•  “Your Love is my drug” by Brianne Kent in BlueSci http://www.bluesci.org/?p=7474

•  “Why do we love: the nature and chemistry of romantic love“ – a book by Helen Fisher is at Amazon Books http://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-We-Love-Chemistry-Romantic/dp/0805077960

Roger spoke to Matt Bruff of Altela Inc, when they visited Cambridge this week. This Denver company create large scale water recycling plants that handle the massive quantities of polluted water that arise from extracting oil and gas. Matt tells how their technology gives water that’s pretty much ready to drink. Thanks by the gallon to Altela Inc  http://altelainc.com

The Science Show 14/07/2012

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Parasites + Holiday health – 105science

Journal editor Sally Hirst talks about an interesting group of micro-organisms called parasites. Interviewed by Roger Frost. And in Chris Creese’s holiday health tips. Chris looks at the science behind travel advice and offers tips on how sun cream works and more.

The Science Show 30/06/2012

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A contagious cancer + How herbicides work – 105science

Learn about a cute animal, that goes by the much less cute name of the Tasmanian Devil. It is a fast disappearing creature that can suffer from an unusual cancer that is contagious. The Science Show’s Chris Creese spoke with Sanger Institute researcher Elizabeth Murchison to understand what’s going on. As the season spring switched  to summer we look at weedkillers. How do weedkillers work? How can a weedkiller target one plant and not another? Roger Frost asked plant scientist, Chris Creese to explain and gained some surprisingly useful answers

The Science Show 16/06/2012

 

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Making chocolate + Jargon and words in science – 105science

Chocolatier Cheryl Brighty of Artistry in Cocoa, tells Nicola Terry how chocolate is made from a cocoa pod. Cambridge science teacher Dr William Hirst talks to Roger Frost explaining that learning the language of science can improve children’s success at school. Dr Hirst is the author of a science dictionary for ages 10 -14 called “William’s Words in Science” www.williamswords.co.uk

Artistry in cocoa www.artistryincocoa.co.uk

The Science Show 19/05/2012

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An eco-home + The aims of Cambridge Carbon Footprint – 105science

Eco-homes feature: Roger Frost visits a stunning, super-insulated city home that minimises its use of energy; has a garden for insulation on the roof but without a heat pump in sight. He talks to architect Jeremy Ashworth about the ways that his building saves energy. We go behind the scenes of Cambridge’s OPEN ECO HOMES event. Over two weekends in May the public are invited on tours of local properties to hear about measures taken to reduce their energy use. Roger speaks to Helen Karapandzic from the organisers, Cambridge Carbon Footprint. He hears how we can get involved and see the energy-saving options in action. Thanks to http://cambridgecarbonfootprint.org/ Thanks also to Ashworth Parkes Architects Limited http://www.ashworthparkes.co.uk

For case studies see http://openecohomes.org The ‘Open eco homes’ weekends were on 12/13 May and 26/27 May 2012. 

The Science Show 05/05/2012

 

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Mobile phone signals + Olive oil and the Mediterranean diet – 105science

Chris Cox from the Cambourne-based, ‘IP access’ explains to Roger Frost how phones talk to radio masts; how signals decrease inside buildings and how femtocells (aka ‘small cells’) can improve signals in places and buildings with a weak signal. (With thanks to ip.access www.ipaccess.com). Following the news that the sponsors of the London Olympic games include a fizzy drink maker; a fast food restaurant and a chocolate brand, we go in search of good advice on diet. We meet Cambridge doctor, Simon Poole who offered his knowledge on healthy food. He talks about different types of fat; the difference Omega-3 and Omega-6 and the Mediterranean diet. Dr Poole gives free talks to community groups and can be contacted via his website: The Taste of the Mediterranean at http://www.tasteofthemed.com

The Science Show 23/04/2012

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Cambridge Water Company + Finding a place at Oxbridge – 105science

Stephen Kay of the Cambridge Water Company talks to Nicola Terry on how the city is kept supplied with water. We learn about our underground source of water and an intriguing range of pipes. We also hear about a lovely ‘Dry Garden’, containing not-so thirsty plants, which CW established at Cambridge University Botanical gardens. Find a water use calculator; tips for water economy and recommended garden plants at Cambridge Water Company cambridge-water.co.uk. This show also looks at information to help students make a better choice of university. Roger Frost talks to former college admissions tutor John Green on the need for scientific data and intelligent ways to analyse it. Read more at myoxbridgechoice.com. Read about the suggestion to reform university admissions at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-15492470

The Science Show 07/04/2012

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IUCN conservation + Plants and drought – 105science

IUCN is the world’s oldest and largest environmental organisation and has a base in Cambridge. Nicola Terry hears from with the IUCN’s Rebecca Miller about her work at the ‘International Union for Conservation of Nature’ in Huntingdon Road. With water shortages and hosepipe bans in the news, Nicola talks to plant scientist Helen Holmes about the importance of water and how plants respond to a lack of water.  Helen is based at the University of Cambridge Department of Science and works on projects with Rothamstead Research in Hertfordshire.

The Science Show (24/03/12) is Cambridge 105’s fortnightly look at science news in and around Cambridge.

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Heat seekers infra red camera + Antarctic hydrothermal vents – 105science

Heat Seekers’ Dawn Morley explains how their infra red camera in a van is able to ‘see’ where a house loses its heat. Staff trainer Dawn spoke to Nicola Terry.  Roger Frost visits the British Antarctic Survey HQ at Madingley to hear from scientist Dr Alastair Graham about the work of BAS and about the life around hydrothermal vents. (With thanks to BAS at www.bas.ac.uk– more at http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/about_bas/news/news_story.php?id=1688)

Contact Heat Seekers on 0800 111 4968 or go to www.homeheatseekers.co.uk.

The Science Show (10/03/12)

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Dataloggers for agriculture + Art of Science game – 105science

“The Art of Science” is a unique science quiz game and we ask quiz  expert, Nigel Oakely what it’s like to play. Read more at www.academicboardgames.com. Roger Frost meets Tony Peloe from Cambridge firm, Delta-T, who supply plant and environment monitoring equipment to plant growers and researchers.  (With thanks to Delta-T http://www.delta-t.co.uk ). Nicola Terry looks at a new explanation of why zebras have stripes. She finds  that a property of the stripes keeps Tsetse flies away.http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/16944753

The Science Show (19/02/12)

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A building scientist’s home + Infra red and the Mona Lisa – 105science

Building scientist David Crowther explains how a heat pump, underfloor heating and good insulation keep his Cambridge house warm. He was talking to the Science Show’s Nicola Terry. And with news of the discovery of ‘another’ Mona Lisa, Roger Frost talks to local inventor Lawrence Robinson about the OSIRIS infra-red camera which can ‘see’ under the paint of paintings – with thanks to www.opusinstruments.com.

Science Show (05/02/12)

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How houses lose heat + Scientists who help the choice of materials – 105science

Dr Ray Galvin talks about ways that our houses lose heat. He suggests that we might look at dehumidifiers and heat pumps to reduce our energy  bill. Stuart Dye from Granta Design explains how they help engineers  choose materials to make a product. Nicola Terry discusses research showing that GCSE results take a dip in years with football tournaments. Roger Frost discovers that methane gas can be extracted from underground rocks and enthuses over a BBC TV program called ‘To boldly go’

Science Show (22/01/12)

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